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The Role Play App

I got an email recently about a new iPhone app from Edublogs, which is the platform I use for my class blog. Since today is the day I teach at the community center (no Internet except for my phone) and I had planned to have students review language, it was a good opportunity to try it out. While it isn’t really an app for role plays, that was the use I had in mind for today’s lesson. (more…)

Raising a Digital Native in Argentina (by Jennifer Verschoor)

Deciding where to send your child to school is arguably one of the hardest decisions a parent has to make. My  4 year old daughter attends a regular school in Buenos Aires,  Argentina. The school is not bilingual and offers English as a compulsory subject.

I have been speaking in English to my daughter since she was born. She understands the language and feels very confident. Children at school even thought she came from “Disneyland” because she was fluent in English. (more…)

Yes, you can! (write for Teaching Village)

We’re better when we work together.

This isn’t just the tag line for Teaching Village, it’s what I believe. I’m a big fan of teaching degrees and licenses–I have a handful of my own, and value what I gained in the pursuit of them. However, I also believe that great wisdom comes from teacher experience in the classroom, and that we are all better ELT practitioners when we learn from each other. (more…)

Meeting Challenges in the EFL Classroom/ Part 2: Using technology (by Christina Markoulaki)


You can read the first part of this post
here.

The outline of the presentation with all the links can be found here.

Moving on to the second challenge all teachers around the world need to face at some point, I am going to refer to the constant use of books or anything that comes in paper. Yes, all printed material is extremely useful and informative, but hasn’t it become too predictable these days? Students invariably expect that photocopies will be handed to them, that they will play some kind of board or card game at the end of the unit and that they will have to submit their homework on a piece of paper. This will come as a surprising statement from a fanatic book lover and proponent of using coursebooks in the classroom, but I have finally realized that if we want to truly attract students’ interest, then we need to think of unique ways to spice up the learning procedure. (more…)

It’s Worth Taking a Look at This Blog

I love initiatives like this one, that give us a chance to introduce great people to other great people. “Vale a pena ficar do olho nesse blog” means “It’s worth keeping an eye on this blog”.

I’m honored to be have been tagged by five teachers I admire whose blogs I really enjoy: Janet Biachini in Italy, Sheetal Makhan in Korea , Marta Mrozik in Poland, Sue Lyon-Jones in the UK, and Anita Kwiatkowska in Turkey. Their lists contain some fabulous blogs, and are definitely worth taking a look at! (more…)

How to create video activities on a teacher’s blog (by Christina Markoulaki)

The focal point of my previous post on this blog were the potential ways teachers can help their students to organize and practice their knowledge by setting up a blog especially for them. Since video activities on a teacher’s blog seem to be the most appealing ones to learners of all ages, I will now briefly number a series of easy steps for those who wish to take advantage of the potential all kinds of videos offer for making attention- grabbing blog activities. It is to be noted that I have consciously avoided complex educational jargon, having outlined the procedure as it practically happens in an everyday lesson.

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Teaching High School in Croatia (by Arjana Blazic)

To teach is to touch a life forever.

I have been trying to enhance my teaching with the new technologies since 1997 when I created my first web page while attending a seminar on New Technologies in Modern Language Teaching in Finland. But everything I did over those twelve years was nothing compared to what I have been doing since I joined Twitter and built my PLN in April 2009.

Today my students and I use technology to connect with students and teachers from all over the world. We tweet, we ning, we skype, we glog, we wiki, we blog … we learn, we understand, we respect. (more…)

How to integrate blogging in EFL teaching (by Christina Markoulaki)

I am pretty confident that a vast majority of EFL

teachers relish blogging, but each one employs this practice in his/her teaching differently. I am therefore taking the initiative to write this post to ask and give an answer to this question:  Have you ever thought of creating a blog for your students to use? A blog that will challenge them to think, to produce the target language and subsequently demonstrate their work to the world? (more…)

Recognizing the Worthy

“Don’t worry when you are not recognized, but strive to be worthy of recognition.”

Abraham Lincoln

I started blogging to explore a belief that “we are stronger, better teachers when we work together, share our knowledge, and connect with others.” I’m only marginally better at the tech stuff now than I was at the start, but I’ve learned a lot about the power of the internet to create a community of teachers.

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On Becoming Socially Networked

The Internet and I have reached a turning point in our relationship.

Don’t get me wrong–we’re not breaking up. I have adored the World Wide Web since we first met in the 1990s, and depend on it daily. I use Skype to talk to my family, download books to my Kindle, watch TV on my Slingbox, store my photos on Flickr, and collaborate with co-authors through e-mail.

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