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Professional Development

Teaching less, recycling more

recycling language with cubes

In an education environment that screams ‘More! More! More!’ sometimes the smart teaching move can be to teach less. If you don’t have to spend your entire class explaining new language, students can spend more time recycling, reinforcing, and expanding the language they learn.

If this topic interests you, I will be giving an online webinar for Oxford University Press on Thursday, May 8th, at 12:30 BST. (That’s 7:30 am in New York, 8:30 am in Brazil, 3:30 pm in UAE, and 8:30 pm in Japan). The webinar is free, but you must register to attend. Even if you can’t attend live, registering means that you’ll receive a link to the recording after the webinar. OUP usually closes registration 24 hours before the online event, so I encourage you to register soon if you would like to be included.

Click this link to register for the webinar:

Recycling, reinforcing and building on new language for young learners

 

webinar

If you’d like to read more about this teaching approach, and how it might work in your own teaching context, you might enjoy guest posts I’ve recently written for the iTDi Blog and for the OUP ELT Global Blog:

Reduce! Reuse! Recycle!

Teach less to help young students learn more

Hope to see you online May 8th!

Spring Blog Festival

Have you ever wondered why people blog? Are you interested in learning more about blogging? Are you already blogging and wanting to become a better blogger? Then you will definitely want to plan to attend the Spring Blog Festival! This is a free, 3-day, online event organized by Nellie Muller Deutsch, Shelly Sanchez Terrell, and Sylvia Guinan.

Spring Blog Festival

Read more about the event on the WizIQ blog.

When? March 14-16, 2014

Where? Online via the WizIQ Virtual Classroom

What? A 3-day event showcasing bloggers, their work, and valuable tips for using blogging for reflective practice or with students

Register: SPRING BLOG FESTIVAL (Registering allows you to receive a certificate for participation)

I’m excited to be part of this event! I’ll be part of a panel about authors who blog, along with Luke Meddings, David Deubelbeiss, and Chuck Sandy. Our panel discussion will take place on Saturday, March 15th at 1 pm GMT (10 pm in Japan). You can get more information about our panel here.

March_15_panel

You can see the entire program here, with an incredible line-up of authors, teachers, trainers, and projects that are sure to inspire.

blog_festival

 

 

Why I love Teachers 2014

I'm in love with teaching

A few years ago I wrote a simple little post about the reasons I love Teachers. Since then, I’ve had a chance to work with some amazing Teachers through the International Teacher Development Institute. So, I thought it was time to bring the post out,  dust it off, and update my list of reasons. (more…)

Would you please do me a favor? Thank you!

Icebergs

When you look around online these days, it seems as if there always something happening for teachers. There’s so much that at times it can be a bit overwhelming to choose from the number of webinars, courses, workshops, conferences, chats, and blogs available. Much of it is free. And yet, whenever I travel to do face-to-face workshops, most of the teachers I meet are still not online for their own professional development.
(more…)

International conferences, for free

Last night, I watched David Crystal’s plenary talk at the IATEFL conference. Of course, it was still morning in Liverpool, where he was speaking. I couldn’t get to Liverpool this year, as much as I wanted to. But, being able to watch the livestream from the comfort of my living room is a pretty good deal. I was able to share the plenary with over 200 good friends in far flung corners of the globe. And for friends whose far corners don’t include decent Internet connections, there’s a recording. (more…)

It’s all about reading

libraryThis month, Let’s Share is all about reading.

Reading is arguably the most important skill we can help our students develop. While we assume that speaking and listening will be important in our students’ future lives and careers, we don’t honestly have any idea how much opportunity they’ll have to talk to other people in English. Being able to read in English, however, opens windows to the world. All of our students will have access to the Internet, and English is likely to remain the lingua franca online for the foreseeable future. Not being able to read in English limits our students to only that small part of the Web that is in their native language. (more…)

What I’ve learned and am still learning (by Ratnavathy Ragunathan)

Note from Barb: If you’ve been over to the iTDi blog this week, you’ll know that the theme is What I’ve learned in 2012. I was thrilled when Ratna suggested a post on the same topic for Teaching Village since our Villagers are always learning from each other. I think a lot of you will be able to relate to the lessons learned by Ratna this year, and by Scott, John, Yitzha, Ann, Divya, and Chuck (in their iTDi posts). I know I did! 

What have I learned……

…….and am still learning, I must say. My oh my, what a “box-of-chocolates” this year’s been for me! Full of surprises and beyond what I would’ve possibly envisioned. 2012 has, indeed, been so productive that I count my blessings everyday for each moment and opportunity that’s knocked on my door. And this gently nudges me back to the question : so, what have I learned from The Wise Master 2012? (more…)

Sharing is caring

If you’ve read my About page, you know that one of my day jobs is co-author of a coursebook series called Let’s Go, for children learning English as a foreign language. I’ve worked with my co-authors Ritsuko Nakata, Karen Frazier, and Carolyn Graham for more than 20 years. We’ve shared many “firsts” during our long partnership, quite a few involving technology. We got our first computers in order to write the books, and our first fax machines in order to share drafts of units (because the Internet was still off in the future). When e-mail finally came along, our first messages were sent to each other. Our books have given us amazing opportunities to share what we’ve learned in workshops with teachers around the world, and to learn even more from working with those teachers. (more…)

What I learnt from my German Teacher (by Christopher Wilson)

Let me start off by saying I was not a good German student.

I found learning languages very hard at secondary school and only took German because I had to study a language and I found it easier than French (despite studying French for longer). (more…)

XXIII Rules for Student-Centered Language Teaching (by John F. Fanselow)

Note from Barb: 25 years ago, John F. Fanselow published Breaking Rulesencouraging teachers to really see what was happening in their classrooms, and then considering alternatives. John’s work had a powerful, positive influence  on my own teaching, and I’m thrilled that iTDi is working with John to offer a truly unique five-week course starting in November: Breaking Rules Live. It’s a rare opportunity to work interactively with someone who is certain to challenge your thinking, revitalize your teaching, and inspire you as an educator. (more…)