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PLN Advice

Help! I just got another new student!

pick me

What happens when a new student enters your class at a very different level than the students who are already there? That’s the question a teacher would like to ask Villagers (that’s you!). Have you ever been in this situation? What advice can you share?  (more…)

When kids don’t want to be there

 

angry student
Image: sizumaru

Teaching Villagers rock! I’ve shared two problem situations with you recently, and the advice has been superb. Both teachers really appreciated your shared wisdom. I have another teacher with another fairly common problem. I’m sure you’ll be able to provide some excellent ideas for this situation, too.

What do you do when you have a student who just doesn’t want to be in your class? Young learners don’t often choose to study English. They are in English class because their parents think it’s a good thing for them to do.

I have kids that just shout for no reason other than to be loud and annoy other kids. One kid broke all the lead in my mechanical pencil for no reason other than it was there. Then he (the pencil lead breaking kid) snuck upstairs after asking to go to the bathroom. (I teach at home.) I know he doesn’t want to be there. His mom is definitely sending her boys to English class to get them out of her hair (the younger brother is in kindy class and he doesn’t want to be there, but he’s not *too* disruptive or destructive). She has a 9-month old and a husband that doesn’t live at home right now. I don’t really want to tell anyone not to come (I need the money!) but … *sigh*. This is my elementary class–he is in 3rd grade. The class isn’t very demanding, we review what we’ve learned, we play games, and sing songs. It’s hard because the student doesn’t want or understand why he is in English class.

Can you help? Have you ever had a student who acted this way? What suggestions can you give this teacher?

A very bad, horrible, no good class

We’ve all had them! That class when, for whatever reason, nothing seems to go right. A teacher friend of mine had a class like that today.

 Parachute Games

Image: markheybo

It was worst… the lesson was worst… Kids were running around, laid themselves down on the floor, spoke Japanese a lot, didn’t listen to me and others from the song!!! But they were very nice to play with parachute.. One of their mothers told me, kids didn’t understand what I said during the lesson. So they felt the lesson was not so interesting. Have you ever had the lesson like that? What do you do for that?

 

This is a mixed ability class, where brand new beginners have joined an existing class. The beginners were the students who were most energetic (and a bit out of control). The mother offering her impression of the problem is the parent of one of the more experienced learners.

What advice can you share? What do you do with lessons go wrong? How do you integrate beginners in a continuing class?

 

Boisterous Boys and Bored Girls

I had a recent reminder of the power behind this blog’s simple motto: We’re better when we work together.

To get some guidance in preparing for an upcoming webinar about working with large, small, and mixed-ability classes (part of OUP’s Let’s Share project), I put a request out on my facebook page. The webinar is only an hour long, and I want to be sure I touch on the topics that matter most to teachers. I really hate wasting anyone’s time :) (more…)