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Spring Blog Festival

Have you ever wondered why people blog? Are you interested in learning more about blogging? Are you already blogging and wanting to become a better blogger? Then you will definitely want to plan to attend the Spring Blog Festival! This is a free, 3-day, online event organized by Nellie Muller Deutsch, Shelly Sanchez Terrell, and Sylvia Guinan.

Spring Blog Festival

Read more about the event on the WizIQ blog.

When? March 14-16, 2014

Where? Online via the WizIQ Virtual Classroom

What? A 3-day event showcasing bloggers, their work, and valuable tips for using blogging for reflective practice or with students

Register: SPRING BLOG FESTIVAL (Registering allows you to receive a certificate for participation)

I’m excited to be part of this event! I’ll be part of a panel about authors who blog, along with Luke Meddings, David Deubelbeiss, and Chuck Sandy. Our panel discussion will take place on Saturday, March 15th at 1 pm GMT (10 pm in Japan). You can get more information about our panel here.

March_15_panel

You can see the entire program here, with an incredible line-up of authors, teachers, trainers, and projects that are sure to inspire.

blog_festival

 

 

Why I love Teachers 2014

I'm in love with teaching

A few years ago I wrote a simple little post about the reasons I love Teachers. Since then, I’ve had a chance to work with some amazing Teachers through the International Teacher Development Institute. So, I thought it was time to bring the post out,  dust it off, and update my list of reasons. (more…)

Would you please do me a favor? Thank you!

Icebergs

When you look around online these days, it seems as if there always something happening for teachers. There’s so much that at times it can be a bit overwhelming to choose from the number of webinars, courses, workshops, conferences, chats, and blogs available. Much of it is free. And yet, whenever I travel to do face-to-face workshops, most of the teachers I meet are still not online for their own professional development.
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Using cell phones in the classroom when computers are not available (by Fabiana Casella)

Fabiana Casella_nd Advanced 2013_Argentina
Fabiana Shortlisted

Congratulations Fabiana! Click this image and “like” the facebook image to vote for Fabiana!

Everybody is talking about 21st Century skills and preparing students for a whole different world. The truth is that our students have become digital and there are a whole lot of educators around the world who are still “analog”. That is why I would like to share my work with my two secondary school groups with as many teachers as possible. Internet and Technology in the Classroom have made a huge change in my daily teaching experience.

My story starts right after my first online presentation for The Future of Education Reform Symposium 2013, (RSCON4)  where I was kindly invited to participate by Shelly Sanchez Terrell. Some hours later, I got a message from Barbara Hoskins Sakamoto, who asked me if I would like to write for this High Tech Ideas in the Low Tech Classroom section in Teaching Village. I was flattered, and accepted immediately, but it really took me quite a long time to put ideas together and I thank my dear friend, Rose Bard, for giving me some support.
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Teaching Pronunciation that Matters (by Nina Septina)

Nina on guitar

Pronunciation is like an art to me, and I’ve always enjoyed it. It is like learning how to play guitar, where we have to figure out when to use different picking strategies or strumming patterns to produce the desired sounds. In pronunciation, we also need to use many different techniques and tongue positions in our mouth to produce the right sounds. Another similarity is that we’ve got to know when to change how hard or softly we should hit the guitar strings when playing a song. The same thing happens when we have to figure out how hard or how soft we should stress certain syllables in words, or some words in sentences when speaking. Finally, there’s the use of rhythm as the main component that shapes the flow of the song, just as it also shapes the flow of the speech in pronunciation.
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Help! I just got another new student!

pick me

What happens when a new student enters your class at a very different level than the students who are already there? That’s the question a teacher would like to ask Villagers (that’s you!). Have you ever been in this situation? What advice can you share?  (more…)

Parking Lot Archaeology: An engaging angle on teaching academic English (by Ron Campbell)

Every car tells a story

“Every car tells a story; all you have to do is listen”

It’s become something of a cliché, but every teaching situation presents its own unique set of challenges. However, my challenge wasn’t all that unique – in fact, it was pretty well-worn itself. My students were falling asleep as I tried to guide them through science readings and lectures in preparation for the TOEFL.

What I’d like to offer you here is a brief review of a class project that seemed to catch my students’ interest and got them deeply involved with academic material.  This one simple exercise opened a wide door into helping students interact with abstract material and getting them to build a set of experiential and critical thinking tools that they could call on later when trying to understand and appreciate other technical topics in English.

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You’re a thief and a liar (by Graham Jones)

SkypeRead: Movie read-through for language learners

TESS: Do you know what your problem is?

DANNY: I only have one?

Ocean’s Eleven (Warner Bros., 2001)

The scene in Ocean’s Eleven where Danny confronts Tess, his ex-wife, in the restaurant of the Bellagio hotel and casino is a wonderful bit of cinema.

The emotions of the characters are highly complex. Danny — who has just been released from prison — still loves Tess and wants her back. Tess, on the other hand, hates Danny. But, deep down, she still loves him too. She’s also terrified, because her new husband — Terry Benedict, the ruthless owner of the Bellagio — is about to arrive at any moment. Things are complicated for Danny as well. He’s secretly planning to steal a hundred and fifty million dollars from Benedict.

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Kids on Tablets: More Addictive than Pills (by Patrick Jackson)

My ten-year-old son Kai and his friends don’t have crazes in the same way that we did as kids. We had crazes for everything, becoming obsessed by roller-skating, paper planes, conkers, skipping, marbles, hopscotch, spinning tops, catapults and tiddlywinks just to name a few. There was even a craze for knitting one year. There were also crazes for collecting things; cards, stamps, figurines from cereal boxes, beer mats, stickers. You name it and it was probably a craze at some time or other. Battled over, swapped and just as soon dropped, these were the lifeblood of our playtime. I guess that three weeks was the average length of a craze but during those three weeks you couldn’t imagine that it wasn’t going to last forever. Some crazes were seasonal, while others cropped up randomly. We were all over them like locusts while they lasted. During a craze we ate, slept and breathed nothing else. In some ways I guess I haven’t changed.

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Children’s perceptions of poverty, race and culture (by Kieran Dhunna Halliwell)

I saw a really interesting article posted on Facebook, entitled ‘Photos of Children from around the World with Their Most Prized Possessions’. For those who haven’t seen it, the article shows images of children in their home settings, surrounded by a selection of their favourite toys, and there are comments left by viewers of the article generally saying what a lovely idea it is. Several users suggest that the collection would be a good idea for a children’s book and advocate that the images could be used to educate children about other countries and cultures.

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